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Table 1 Typical peanut-containing foods, their peanut protein content, and feeding tips for infants [2]

From: Early introduction of foods to prevent food allergy

  Peanut butter Peanuts Peanut flour or peanut butter powder Bamba
Amount containing approximately 2 g of peanut protein 9–10 g or 2 teaspoons 8 g or ~ 10 whole peanuts (2½ teaspoons of grounded peanuts) 4 g or 2 teaspoons 17 g or 2/3 of a 28-g (1-oz) bag or 21 sticks
Typical serving size Spread on a slice of bread or toast (16 g) 2½ teaspoons of ground peanuts (8 g) No typical serving size 1 bag (28 g)
Peanut protein per typical serving 3.4 g 2.1 g No typical serving size 3.2 g
Feeding tips • For a smooth texture, mix with warm water (then let cool) or breast milk or infant formula
• For older children, mix with pureed or mashed fruit or vegetables or any suitable family foods, such as yogurt or mashed potatoes
• Use blender to create a powder or paste
• 2-2½ teaspoons of ground peanuts can be added to a portion of yogurt or pureed fruit or savory meal
• Mix with yogurt or applesauce • For a smooth texture, mix with warm water (then let cool) or breast milk or infant formula and mash well
• Pureed or mashed fruit or vegetables can be added
• Older children can be offered sticks of Bamba
  1. Bamba (Osem, Israel) is named because it was the product used in the LEAP trial and therefore has known peanut protein content and proven efficacy and safety. Other peanut puff products with similar peanut protein content can be substituted for Bamba
  2. Teaspoons and tablespoons are US measures (5 and 15 mL for a level teaspoon or tablespoon, respectively)
  3. Adapted from: Togias et al. [2]