Volume 10 Supplement 1

Canadian Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology Annual Scientific Meeting 2013

Open Access

Diagnosis of nasal and eye allergies: the Allergies, Immunotherapy, and RhinoconjunctivitiS (AIRS) patient survey

  • Michael Blaiss1,
  • Mark Dykewicz2,
  • Bryan Leatherman3,
  • David Skoner4,
  • Nancy Smith5 and
  • Felicia Allen-Ramey5
Allergy, Asthma & Clinical Immunology201410(Suppl 1):A59

https://doi.org/10.1186/1710-1492-10-S1-A59

Published: 3 March 2014

Background

Knowledge and avoidance of allergies can lead to better allergy symptom control. The AIRS study assessed approaches to diagnosis of nasal and eye allergies or allergic rhinoconjunctivitis in the US.

Methods

A national sample of 34,030 households using a dual frame approach of random digit dialing and cell phone sample were targeted. Patients aged =5 years with a health care professional diagnosis of hay fever, allergic rhinitis, rhino-conjunctivitis, nasal or eye allergies and symptoms or medication for condition in past 12 months were surveyed. Data on specific diagnosis and allergy testing were collected.

Results

Based on screening land-line sample of 20,835 households, 18% of individuals were diagnosed with one of conditions of interest. Of the 2765 surveyed patients, 86% were diagnosed with nasal allergies, 59%, hay fever, 54% eye allergies, 30%, allergic rhinitis and 13%, rhinoconjunctivitis. Four percent of respondents reported they were given an allergy test by doctor or health professional in past four months, 3% in past year, 7%, 1-2 years ago, and 37%, 3 or more years ago. Of those, 71% reported that they had a skin prick test, 13% had blood test and 12% had both blood and skin prick test. 47% report they never received an allergy test.

Conclusions

The AIRS survey demonstrated that 18% of individuals > 5 years were diagnosed with an above allergic condition. Although these respondents had been diagnosed by a health care professional with “allergies”, almost half never had any allergy testing to determine the triggers of their condition.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Allergy & Asthma Care
(2)
Wake Forrest Baptist Health
(3)
Coastal ENT Associates
(4)
West Penn Allegheny Health System
(5)
Merck & Co, Inc

Copyright

© Allen-Ramey et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. 2014

This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

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