Volume 10 Supplement 2

Canadian Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology and AllerGen Abstracts 2014

Open Access

Xolair® (omalizumab) enrollment in a tertiary care allergy and asthma clinic in Canada

  • Jodi Cameron1,
  • Jennifer Forgie1,
  • Alicia Ring1,
  • Stephanie Santucci1,
  • Caroline Rizk2,
  • Hoang Pham3,
  • John O’Quinn1 and
  • William H Yang1, 3
Allergy, Asthma & Clinical Immunology201410(Suppl 2):A5

https://doi.org/10.1186/1710-1492-10-S2-A5

Published: 18 December 2014

Background

Xolair ® (omalizumab) has been approved in Canada since 2004 for the treatment of moderate to severe persistent allergic asthma in patients 12 years of age. The use of omalizumab in severe persistent allergic asthma may lead to decrease health care utilization through emergency room (ER) visits, hospitalizations, visits to health care providers, as well as, decrease the use of corticosteroids and improve the overall quality of life (QoL).

Methods

Data collected from patient enrollment and QoL questionnaires completed at specific intervals during treatment with omalizumab at our large tertiary care clinic from 2004 to 2014 was analyzed.

Results

A steady number of patients were enrolled each year since 2004, showing its greatest increase in enrollment numbers since 2012. Our data indicates that the majority of patients improved with significantly less asthma exacerbation, less ER visits and hospitalizations, less use of inhaled and oral corticosteroids and better QoL.

Conclusion

Omalizumab is effective in the treatment of moderate and severe allergic asthma. It improves QoL and reduces asthma exacerbations, ER visits and hospitalizations, and use of inhaled and oral corticosteroids.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Allergy and Asthma Research Centre
(2)
Department of Clinical Immunology and Allergy, McGill University
(3)
University of Ottawa Medical School

Copyright

© Cameron et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. 2014

This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

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