Volume 10 Supplement 1

Canadian Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology Annual Scientific Meeting 2013

Open Access

Parental inheritance and perinatal tobacco smoke exposure increase the gender-dependent risk of physician diagnosed asthma at preschool age

  • Chih-Chiang Wu1, 2, 3,
  • Te-Yao Hsu4,
  • Ho-Chang Kuo5,
  • Chia-Yu Ou4,
  • Jen-Chieh Chang6, 7,
  • Chieh-An Liu8,
  • Chih-Lu Wang8,
  • Hua Chuang7,
  • Hsiu-Mei Liang4 and
  • Kuender D Yang2, 3, 9Email author
Allergy, Asthma & Clinical Immunology201410(Suppl 1):A54

https://doi.org/10.1186/1710-1492-10-S1-A54

Published: 3 March 2014

Background

Genetic inheritance and perinatal tobacco smoke exposure (TSE) have been proven to be critical for the development of childhood allergic diseases [1, 2]. This study investigated the interactive roles of parental allergic histories and TSE on the development of childhood asthma at 6 years old.

Methods

A birth cohort in southern Taiwan was studied. Information about parental allergic histories, gender, prematurity, TSE, and childhood allergic disease ever diagnosed by a physician were acquired from questionnaire during follow up. Children were asked to follow up at 6 years of age for allergic questionnaire and sensitization examination (CAP system).

Results

In this cohort study, 748 of the children with complete data were analyzed. 217 (29%) of children had positive parental allergic history, 191 (25.5%) of children had TSE history, and 186 (24.9%) of children had been diagnosed as asthma by a physician in the first 6 years of life. In a regression analysis, physician diagnosed asthma ever in the first 6 years of life were significantly associated with male gender (OR: 1.941, 95% CI: 1.371-2.748, p<0.001), either parent with allergic diseases (OR: 1.548, 95% CI: 1.047-2.288, p=0.028), and TSE (OR: 1.504, 95% CI: 1.038-2.179, p=0.031), but not significantly associated with preterm (p=0.801). TSE with more than 20 cigarettes per day made children significantly higher risky to have physician-diagnosed-asthma than those with smoke exposure less than 20 cigarettes per day or those without smoke exposure (35%, 25% and 22.7% respectively, p=0.003). TSE was not related to physician diagnosed rhinitis, dermatitis or allergic sensitization by 6 years of age (p>0.5). Besides, TSE and parental allergic history had synergistic influence on the physician diagnosed asthma ever in the 6 years of life. This synergistic influence was significant in girls, rather than in boys (Table 1).
Table 1

TSE and parental allergic history had synergistic influence on the physician diagnosed asthma ever in the 6 years of life. This synergistic influence was significant in girls, rather than boys

All

physician diagnosed asthma

OR

95%CI

p (compared with A)

parent allergic disorder -, TSE- (A)

30/161

18.60%

1

  

parent allergic disorder +, TSE-

97/396

24.00%

1.417

0.896-2.240

0.135

parent allergic disorder -, TSE+

13/56

23.20%

1.32

0.632-2.757

0.459

parent allergic disorder +, TSE+

46/135

34.10%

2.257

1.325-3.846

0.002

Girls

   

p (compared with A1)

parent allergic disorder -, TSE- (A1)

4/72

5.60%

1

  

parent allergic disorder +, TSE-

38/196

19.40%

4.089

1.404-11.905

0.006

parent allergic disorder -, TSE+

3/23

13.00%

2.55

0.526-12.353

0.231

parent allergic disorder +, TSE+

20/61

32.80%

8.293

2.649-25.964

<0.001

Boys

   

p (compared with A2)

parent allergic disorder -, TSE- (A2)

28/89

29.20%

1

  

parent allergic disorder +, TSE-

59/200

29.50%

1.014

0.586-1.755

0.961

parent allergic disorder -, TSE+

10/33

30.30%

1.054

0.441-2.519

0.907

parent allergic disorder +, TSE+

26/74

35.10%

1.313

0.678-2.541

0.419

Conclusions

In the prospective cohort study, we found that male gender, parental allergic history, and TSE were significantly associated with physician diagnosed asthma by 6 years of age. TSE and parental allergic history had synergistic effect on the physician diagnosed asthma by 6 years of age. This synergistic influence was significant in girls, rather than boys.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Department of Pediatrics, Show Chwan Memorial Hospital
(2)
Department of Medical Research, Show Chwan Health Care System in Chang Bing
(3)
Institute of Clinical Medicine, National Yang-Ming University
(4)
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan and Chang Gung University College of Medicine
(5)
Department of Pediatrics, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University College of Medicine
(6)
Division of Dermatology, Department of Medicine, McGill University Health Centre, CanadaInstitute of Biomedical Sciences, National Sun Yat-Sen University
(7)
Genomic and Proteomic Core Laboratory, Department of Medical Research, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University College of Medicine
(8)
Department of Pediatrics, Po-Jen Hospital
(9)
Department of Pediatrics, Po-Jen Hospital

Copyright

© Yang et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. 2014

This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

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